Frog v. Robot

Frog v. Robot

We invite scientists from the Bocas del Toro Research Station of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to come out to Tranquilo Bay and do their research.  On March 9, we had a group of three scientists come out to take some photos and videos of the poison dart frogs interacting with robot frogs.  They put a number of colored robot morphs in play with our resident frogs to see the interaction between the real frog and the robot.  The real frog did not enjoy any other frogs moving in on his territory.  We hope you enjoy the video they shared with us as much as we have.

Frog Trip

Poision Dart Frog Tranquilo Bay

Not long ago we had some guests that wanted to look for frogs. They were specifically looking to find some other variations of the very famous Poison Red Frog (Oophaga pumilio). So, we went to Popa, a nearby island in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago

At the Tranquilo Bay we have two morphs, that are quite similar, the bright orange, almost red with light blue toes and fingers and the bright red with tiny dots on the back.

Frog Photo

One of the morphs of the Poisonous Red Frog (Oophaga pumilio) found on Popa Island.

During this trip to Popa Island we got to see some nice variations in color of the Oophaga pumilio, and we also got great looks and pictures of some other species.

Poison Dart Frog Bocas del Toro

Another coloration of the Poisonous Red Frog (Oophaga pumilio) found in Popa Island.

I have to admit that I never get tired of watching the incredible variation in color of O. Pumilio. It isn’t every day that we get a photographic opportunity to capture a photo of the elusive, and very fast amphibian, the Lovely Poison Frog (Phyllobatrs lugubris).

Frog Morphs Panama

Lovely Poison Frog (Phyllobatrs lugubris)

And if the morning could not get any better, we also found another small inhabitant of the rainforest, a Talamanca Rocket Frog (Allobates talamancae), that showed up and stayed calm for us to photograph him as well.

Frog Photo Safari Panama

Talamanca Rocket Frog (Allobates talamancae)

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Birding Isla Colon

Birding Bocas del ToroSome days ago, Natalia and I were visiting some friends on the neighboring island of Isla Colon (known also as Bocas Isla or, simply, Bocas). We got there after a bus trip from Panama City (and a short water taxi ride), so after 12 hours in a close quarters and some more hours performing as the walking dead, we knew there was an antidote to our situation, as always, go birding.  So we went! Nothing fancy, just on a road around the Y (la Y griega), and some short entrances to farms and pastures. The weather did not look very cooperative but, as we went out, everything started waking up, and so did the sun.

Hiking PanamaAs soon as we stepped out of the house, parrot couples and some small groups of parakeets started flying over.  Calls and sounds were everywhere:  a singing green and yellow “Red frog” (Oophaga pumilio), howling Howler Monkeys, a posing Roadside Hawk model.  We started to feel that this was not going to be a usual birding morning for us.  A group of five Masked Tityras with a Black-crowned Tityra couple, Bronze Hermit feeding four feet away from us, a female White-winged Becard and many migrants that were joining us like Blue and the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. Prothonotary, Yellow, Mourning, Chesnut-sided Warblers, Northern Waterthrush, Gray Catbird, Baltimore Oriol, kept showing up in our binoculars.

Reptiles & Amphibians Bocas del ToroWe experienced sustained bird activity through the whole time we were birding without much variation. Different species of Flycatchers were calling and flirting around. We even had a coconut water drinker, a Black-cheeked Woodpecker.  A friendly Dusky Antbird couple entertained us with their sporadic appearances outside “their” thick clump of leaves.

BIrdwatching PanamaAll this and more we saw during one of the most intense mornings we ever experienced in that area. It is just another example of one of the beauties of birding, you have to be there to catch these good days because you never know when or where it is going to happen.

If you are interested in any more detail of our morning you can access : http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32557965

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Kayaking near Tranquilo Bay

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Due to Tranquilo Bay’s location in a nearly untouched forest area within the Bocas del Toro archipelago, and the fact that it is surrounded by protected waters that hold an incredible collection of coral and sponges, we have almost an unlimited range of things to do and discover right off of the dock.

One of things we can do is take a kayak into the Caribbean Sea.   We often do this directly from Tranquilo Bay’s dock. It is an excellent summary of Bocas del Toro’s many possibilities.

Panama Birding

We start early to avoid paddling under the harshest sun. We glide over calm waters into a mangrove channel. It is here that we can see some interesting wildlife: from cushion starfishes under our kayaks to the beautiful Snowy Cotinga flirting with the top of the trees; or a Keel- billed or Yellow-throated Toucans flying over our heads in the wider areas of the canal; or the Yellow Mangrove Warbler calling at the dense mangrove edge.

bluejeansfrog

If we feel like it, we stop at Isla Popa and check for different color morphs of the famous Strawberry poison dart frog, with their green and orange tones, to the light blue legged ones.

After experiencing the richness of our “over the water” world, on the way back we discover what the underwater world has to offer.

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Endless platforms of coral reef covered in life and color, playful shining fishes, countless brittle stars, mysterious feather-dusters, sponges, crustaceans, ascidians are all visible under the ocean. Each of these animals lets you witness their daily life. Textures and shapes curving underwater are a colorful live work of art.

snorkel

On the end of our kayak trip, it is a good time to compile and archive our memories of all the amazing things we saw within a kayak distance from Tranquilo Bay.

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Symbols of Bocas del Toro

Wildlife PanamaProbably the species most representative of Bocas del Toro are the Poison-dart Frogs (Oophaga pumilio), with all the different colorations found around the archipelago, but another very representative specie is the Red-billed Tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus), a graceful specie found in the some areas of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

Birdwatching PanamaThese birds are found in tropical and subtropical seas, they feed mostly on fish, caught plunge diving. They lived almost their entire life in the Sea. During breeding season they used rocky crevices on remote islands, cliffs are prefer, because it makes easier take of, this birds can not walk much. Both parents share the parental care of their descendants, which is usually one single egg.

Birding Bocas del Toro

Adult and chick of Red-billed Tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus), in their nest

In Bocas there is a small Island, known as Bird Island (Isla pajaro) or Swans’ Cay, which is known for its elegant white birds with long tails.  Everyone who sees them stare with an open mouth at their beauty. Bird Island is a limestone island. Next to it are two smaller islands that offer Magnificent Frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens) palm trees to rest and nesting grounds to Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster).

Birdwatching Panama

Juvenile Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster) begging to one of its parents for food

Magnificent Frigate Bocas del Toro

Males of Magnificent Frigategird ( Fregata magnificent) in their resting spot.

Worldwide the population is declining, mostly for the introduction of invasive species, as rats and cats, which predated the nests. Let hope this Caribbean treasure stays safe of predators and human pressure for the join of all of us and the future generations.

More frogs

Frog Bocas del ToroA few months ago I wrote a blog post about the visit to Bastimentos town with some of the participants with the December 2014 Wildside Nature Tour Photo Workshop where our target species was the colorful Poison Dart Frog (Oophaga pumilio).

Well, I said I would post some more pictures of the different morphs we found that morning, so here are some more of those beautiful and unique colorations found near the town of Bastimentos.

Panama Wildlife

Typical Bocas Moment

I took these pictures in December 2014, on Bastimentos Island, when Wildside Nature Tours came to do their Photo Workshop, on one of our field trips searching for frogs. A young Brown Pelican drying out in an old structure on the water, with a colorful background, reflects to me a typical Caribbean scene.  It causes me to slow down and realize that things happen at a different speed here in the tropics.

brownpelican

And well, I also got a couple of frog pictures, jejeje, I am putting one on this post, more coming!

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