About Renee

Owner/Operator at Tranquilo Bay Eco Adventure Lodge focusing on hospitality, hotel administration and volunteer efforts.

Investing in The Panama Eco Lodge Vacation You Will Love

A lot of people see a vacation as an expense. But we believe it is an investment. When you schedule a beautiful, sustainable, and memorable experience, it does more than make you feel good. It connects you with each member in your party. It lets you unplug and let go of your everyday. You try new things and relax. The investment you make today should be paid back in treasured memories that last a lifetime.

Experience Cost Per Minute Graph

We pursue and believe in treating your vacation as a precious investment. In trying to compare different breaks from your everyday, we looked at four experiences – one day trip to a Disney theme park, a day at Tranquilo Bay, a quick pop into a coffee shop, and a special occasion meal at Canlis. While all of them allow you to unplug, they each come with their own set of benefits and compromises as well as their own cost.

Disney Park Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Disney theme parks are the best value for your money at $0.14 per minute per person. This calculation is based upon the park entrance fee for the number of minutes the park is open. It does not include any meals, beverages, or special perks.

Tranquilo Bay Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Tranquilo Bay Eco Adventure Lodge is an exceptional value at $0.24 per minute per adult. Children would be $.12 per minute each. This calculation is based upon the high season rate including taxes for 18 hours a day, assuming people sleep about eight hours. The price includes meals, beverages, guided activities onsite, use of the private conservation reserve and equipment among all of the other things included in the daily stay rate.

Coffee Shop Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Coffee shop coffee is a good value at somewhere around $.33 a minute per person assuming one purchases a $5.00 beverage and spends about 15 minutes inside the coffee shop.

Canlis Dinner Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

A special occasion meal at Canlis is a great value at $1.10 per minute per person. This calculation is based upon the price fixe menu at $165 per person with dinner service covering about 2 1/2 hours. This does not include any beverages. I can’t wait until I am able to make it to Canlis to celebrate something!

View of Tranquilo Bay's Front "Yard" from the tower with the word "Off" superimposed

As you can see, there are a number of investments we can all make in ourselves or our families. These vary from something we can stop and pick up every day (coffee shop coffee) to a vacation or meal we must plan on and reserve in advance.

Originally Published on IG: November 11, 2021 Modified slightly for publishing here on our blog.

Balancing Compassion & Respect Can Be An Unbelievably Interesting Tightrope Act

With one land purchase, the woman we were going to buy the property from wanted a house. She would move from her land onto a spot with one of her children. Some of her children got involved and supposedly were building the home for her with the funds when, in reality, they were not. Those children took loans against her deposit because one daughter ensured she was a co-signator on the account. These children didn’t repay their loans or build their mother a house. They squandered the funds because the bank took the collateral, so the woman had nowhere to go. She continued to live in the home on our land until the place was ready to fall.

It wasn’t easy to allow it to unfold as it did, but the same thing could have happened anywhere. A person makes a deal and then relies upon another to help them with their funds. The third person turns out to be untrustworthy, and the seller ends up without the “thing” they were trying to acquire with the proceeds from the sale.

As a buyer, we were in no position to affect the situation’s outcome. As compassionate people, we allowed her to live as she had been doing for an extended period. We didn’t evict her even though she had sold her rights to us. We gave her and her family time to develop a plan. She stayed on far after we had finished paying for the land. Yet, once the time came to either move or somehow build a new home at her current spot, we had to remind her and her family of the boundary we had all agreed upon. She sold us the land. We had paid for it and allowed her to continue living when she had a problem. She was not permitted to build anew on land we purchased because her children had stolen from her. We fulfilled our part of the transaction and allowed her to stay beyond the agreed upon timeframe. It was time for her to find a new home.

Because we had both respect and compassion, we allowed the situation to go past what most purchasers would. According to Albert Schweitzer, “Until he extends his circle of compassion to include all living things, man will not himself find peace.” Our attorney was concerned about her failure to depart once we had finished paying. Since we were her neighbors, we were not as worried as the attorney. Yet, we knew we could not afford to purchase it a second time from a third party, so we had to stay close to the transaction parameters. Balancing compassion and respect can be a tightrope at times.

Broken System Breeds Complications in Authentic Relationships

Choosing to lay a groundwork of mutual respect has been an essential part of the foundation for our business.

We believe it has contributed to the fact that we have not had any issues with neighbors or our direct community about property lines. We have a respectful relationship with most of our immediate neighbors.

The strained relationships are strained because we value following laws and regulations, and our neighbors do not have faith in that system. We get it. The infrastructure of the legal system and the government of a long-forgotten province is limited. People have not been accustomed to abiding by the law within such a scenario. Why? Because it is not enforced at all levels. It goes toward the low-hanging fruit and foreigners first when it is attempted. Local people get a pass. Again, it makes sense, but if this community wants to sustain itself in the long run, it needs to include equal enforcement under the law as it charts its path towards regeneration.

As a lawyer, I may be more apt to see these things, yet it is visible. Any time you choose or allow officials to determine whether to enforce a law – it opens the door to corruption. Then there are the laws that might make sense in some parts of the country but not in others. When attempting to enforce a law that physically cannot be applied – officials must turn a blind eye. If the site is to prosper, passing a more limited law or one specific to an area must be part of the plan.

There is a tiny mangrove island islet in front of Tranquilo Bay. We didn’t want anything to be developed on it, so we needed to buy it. Two different people claimed ownership of it, yet neither had occupied it, so it was impossible to confirm. One party had been around longer and had permitted the other party to build in front of a different piece of land. That second party never purchased any land – only built over the water in front of a piece of land. Over time the second party expanded its footprint and abused the gift the first party had given them. We knew that we had to purchase whatever rights both parties believed they had to eliminate any possible issues in the future. So we did – we bought the possessory right to that islet from two different people.

Why? We purchased a tiny island from two parties to maintain community and to dispose of any future problems for ourselves. Lauren Morton defines community as act, “Community is an intentional action rooted in faith, peace, truth, and love.” We chose to buy land from two non-possessory parties because it circles back to having a permanence mindset as part of our decision-making compass.

Mutual Respect Supports Creation of Promising Private Conservation Reserve

Tranquilo Bay’s path to regeneration has been a winding trail with ups, downs, and spills. We didn’t start our business with a defined intention to set up our space within the vocabulary we find in regeneration now, and yet – we did.

Our approach has been more about being a permanent part of the community in which we live. We believe this colors all decisions one makes. When you begin with a permanence mindset and know you are in for a long haul, you make different decisions than if you expect to be around for a season of life.

Because we planned on making Bocas del Toro our home, we took steps to manage our relationships with our neighbors and our community from the beginning. When we completed the survey for the land we were purchasing, we walked the boundaries. We made sure the surveyor drew the survey lines correctly. We spoke to each of our neighbors to ensure we had the limits right. We confirmed that no one else had a stake in the land we were purchasing. We got to know our neighbors, and we began a relationship of mutual respect in these types of matters.

Conservation Reserve Infographic

Dr. Brené Brown tells us that “when we fail to set boundaries and hold people accountable, we feel used and mistreated.” We didn’t want to feel used or mistreated, nor did we want our neighbors to feel that way. So, we set appropriate boundaries and became contributing members of our community.

We applied our values of taking care of your immediate neighborhood to our new home. All our adjacent neighbors became our immediate neighborhood.

Laying this groundwork has been an essential part of the foundation for our business. Mutual respect rather than an assumption of privilege makes for a far better long-term relationship.

What does mutual respect look like? How do you know if it is present or if you are pursuing it?

For us, it meant making sure we knew where the boundaries lay. Then we knew where we stopped, and our neighbors started. It meant we were responsible for our side and not crossing onto their side.

It meant structuring land deals so that both parties had a long-term benefit and relationship. In Bocas del Toro, many people sold their land only to be without cash in a short time because the money came and went. If we were purchasing a piece of land from someone that wasn’t a part of their primary residence, we would buy it straight away because there was no concern about the community’s trajectory. However, whenever we purchased land that was a part of someone’s residence, we took a different path.

We structured a payment plan that worked best for that person and transaction. Structuring it this way gave each party a benefit. The party we were purchasing from had an extended source of regular income. We gave them a sufficient down payment to have a cash bump. They could do something like make significant improvements, buy a boat, or provide a dividend for each of their children. In return, we were able to pay for our investment over time.

Some of the payment plans were based on a set value for the property – those were paid out over a shorter period. Others were based upon a much longer payout where we guaranteed a half-salary for them for many years or until death. While we didn’t know the ultimate price for the land under this setup, we believed it was the right way to support our community.

Learn More About Bocas Eco Lodge’s Remarkable Economic Impact

During the pandemic pause, I studied the Economic Nutrition label that @shorefastfogoisland uses for its social enterprises. In an article entitled “5 Regenerative Solutions For A Positive Future Through Tourism” where @regenerativetravel summarized takeaways from its 2020 Regenerative Travel Summit, Zita Cobb from Shorefast championed radical transparency so that “we can avoid all of the greenwashing and the social washing and the marginalizing of local people, because it’s not dignified for local people, and it’s not dignified for the visitors.”⁣

Her stance, and our studies of our own business, caused us to review our own economic impact. What Shorefast has done and what companies such as Everlane are doing in a retail environment is give the consumer more information about where their money is going. We want to do the same.⁣

Thus we went back and looked at our impact for 2019 since it was a “normal” year. We hadn’t set up our accounting to manage the information as well as we could, but it gave us a baseline to begin from. In 2020 we updated our Chart of Accounts and our regular accounting to better provide information in the future.⁣

Economic Benefit Distribution is a measure of all expenditures made by Tranquilo Bay. Our instance includes Labor & Benefits, purchases from businesses and people within various distances from Tranquilo Bay within Panama, and then those expenses completed outside of Panama. ⁣

Once the number is calculated based on the data within each category, it is then formatted as a percentage of the total company expense.⁣


60% of our expenditures are made within the archipelago and province of Bocas del Toro. An incremental 24% is made within 100 KM of the lodge, so 84% of our expenditures are made within 100 KM of the lodge. We spend about 5% of our total expenditure within Panama but outside of this 100 KM radius which takes all of our spending within Panama to 89%.⁣

So we have 11% of the funds we spend paid to businesses and people outside of Panama itself. We haven’t drilled down into specific items as to whether or not they are made within Panama only from whom we purchase them. One area where we aspire for improvement would be determining where we stand with local goods purchased from grocery stores, etc. We updated our accounting for 2020 to incorporate more detail to calculate that information.⁣

Community Dollar Flow is a measure of all funds that flow into a community because of a particular company. Our instance includes Labor & Benefits, purchases from businesses and people within a 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay, gratuities left for staff, donations made within a 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay, and volunteer hours provided within 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay. Once the number is calculated based on the data within each category, it is then formatted as a percentage of the total company expense.

It is possible to exceed 100% of company expenses within the direct community because the inputs are broader. We are not there yet, but we can continue to aspire for improvement.

This is a graphic example of Community Dollar Flow. ⁣

  1. Labor and benefits paid to or on behalf of our staff.⁣
  2. Purchases from people and businesses within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay. This includes both goods and services. A local tour, transportation, and food vendor would all be included within this category.⁣
  3. Gratuities left for our staff outside of our guides. Our guide tips tend to be direct, and we do not account entirely for these amounts.⁣ Beginning in 2022, we will also include the guide tips as appropriate.
  4. Donations, either in cash or in-kind, made by Tranquilo Bay or our guests within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay.⁣
  5. Volunteer hours provided by lodge ownership, staff, or guests within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay. These hours are accounted for at local labor or consulting levels as they are all provided in kind.⁣

    Taking the total of each of these categories into consideration, for 2019, 97% of our expense level flows directly into the community within 100 KM from Tranquilo Bay. This differs from the 89% of our direct expenses within Panama. We have also added categories three, four, and five, which are contributions to the community yet are not a direct expense.⁣

We now look at this information monthly to ensure things are staying in line and heading in the direction we want. We won’t update it annually until we have a full year of business, and we didn’t have that in 2020 or 2021. We are hopeful that in 2022 we will be open the entire year.⁣

Bocas Eco Lodge Describes Its Unique Guiding Principles

At Tranquilo Bay, we believe that people who experience an authentic, regenerative vacation create treasured memories, but we know treasured memories do not come easy. ⁣

How do you make sure you pick the right vacation? Are the places you are considering transparent about their sustainability and regenerative practices? ⁣

We hope so. That is why we are sharing this type of information about Tranquilo Bay within our transparency and impact series. ⁣

In “Move Over, Sustainable Travel. Regenerative Travel Has Arrived,” the New York Times writes, “Sustainable tourism is sort of a low bar. At the end of the day, it’s just not making a mess of the place. Regenerative tourism says, let’s make it better for future generations.” ⁣

We know that the best measurement we can track is how we improve against ourselves, not against a third party. Thus, we monitor specific metrics to determine how we are doing today and how things change over time. ⁣

If you fail to choose the best location, you could travel to another country and lose your hard-earned vacation time at a commercial green-washed “resort.” We want to help you make the right choice for you and your party. ⁣

We care about your vacation. We care about Bocas del Toro, Panama. We care about doing our part to be the change we want to see in the world. We know you want to do the same when you plan your vacation. ⁣

So, at Tranquilo Bay, we have a set of guiding principles that help us make decisions. This graphic gives you a basic overview of those principles and what’s behind them: steward, serve & sustain.⁣

Stewardship in Action

Under our first principle, which is stewardship, we work to conserve and regenerate that which has been placed into our hands such that we are accountable to the community and the world.⁣

⁣For us, stewardship is where regeneration comes in because regeneration is about “whole systems thinking.” It considers the history of a place to understand one’s role as a steward of the location and its people.⁣

⁣It is no easy feat – it requires specific critical actions to help us make the next right move each day. Within stewardship, we practice ownership or accountability, and we take responsibility for our actions or inaction. We remember to efficiently, diligently, and happily complete our work because we each have commitments to support our team.⁣

Service in Action

Our second principle is that we serve. We support all stakeholders through open-hearted curation and creative communication. This principle is where we practice “after you.” We put others before our self-interest to support our stakeholders: employees, families, guests, the local community, and the world. ⁣

⁣With some profit staying within Tranquilo Bay, we can support a group of employees, guests, the community, and the local economy. As you can see with the connected circles, each group is more inclusive than before. We all rely on one another to preserve and protect Bocas del Toro’s culture, flora, and fauna. A company must be profitable to continue to be a force for good. ⁣

⁣The Singapore Tatler writes, “More than sustainability, regenerative travel allows us to actively participate in reversing climate change and enriching communities.” While there are many definitions for sustainability and a growing number for regeneration, all include serving one another. We must get past our desires and work for the greater good. Our decision-making processes need to consider all creation because we live within that creation – there is no planet B.⁣

Sustainability in Action

Our third principle is that we must Sustain. We do the work that considers the long-term effect of our actions, and we must sustain the business to be a force for good. ⁣

Here we take responsibility for our actions or inaction. Because we know we must sustain this business, this principle reminds us to efficiently, diligently, and happily complete our work.⁣

⁣Under this principle, we place our work in community tourism, education, and science. We work with several different community tourism organizations in Panama, including the Chamber of Tourism of Bocas del Toro (“CAMTURBO”). CAMTURBO is responsible for supporting tourism throughout the province of Bocas del Toro through education, policymaking, and marketing for the destination.⁣

We are also members of APTSO – the sustainable tourism foundation for Panama. We have previously been a part of BSTA, a sustainable tourism alliance for Bocas del Toro. Sustainability is also where we assist local organizations that put children in Bocas del Toro first. We provide field trips for children or auction items for fundraisers for these groups.⁣

⁣As part of our education focus with our guests, it is vital to work with international and national organizations that document, preserve and catalog flora and fauna of Bocas del Toro. We also work with various scientists who study wildlife here in Bocas. You may see an inclusive list of these projects in our Impact Report.⁣

Our Why

Our values and decision-making process have evolved over the years. We embrace aspects of several different philosophies.⁣

We embrace the Triple Bottom Line at the bottom of the pyramid – people, place, and profit. This is where companies are responsible first and foremost to all their stakeholders, including everyone involved with the company, whether directly or indirectly, as well as the planet we’re all living on. But without making a profit – the company cannot continue to be a force for good, so it must make money to keep going.⁣

⁣With the next level – the World We All Deserve. Both environmental and social justice intersect for the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income concerning the development, implementation, and enforcement of laws, regulations, and policies. It’s a lot – but we work on it bit by bit.⁣

⁣The third level – is the aspirational side of regenerative tourism. We are never finished, and we can always learn more and do better once we know more.⁣

⁣And the last level – the one most easily defined as The Golden Rule, where we treat others as we would want to be treated.⁣

⁣We do all of this because it is just and right AND because doing so truly supports our guests’ vacations.⁣

Come Along On The Awesome Whisper Ecological Trail Adventure

Mangrove Creek Isla Popa

Following breakfast, we will leave the facility in a support boat. We take a 15-minute ride across Bastimentos National Marine Park over to the backside of Isla Popa.

In kayaks, (although we skipped them in this video) we will meander through the glassy calm waters of Enrique’s Creek through lush green vegetation. We will paddle through a mangrove creek over to the Whisper Ecological Trail, following the jungle’s edge. The mangrove forest we glide through includes Red, White, and Tea mangroves.


The Tea Mangrove or *Pelliciera rhizophorae* belongs to the “true mangroves” and is fascinating, endangered, and rare. This location is one of the last coastlines in Central America to support this magnificent and unique mangrove. It is called Tea Mangrove because of its leaves which contain tannins and other substances found in tea.

At the beginning of the Miocene Era (about 23 million years ago), Pelliciera rhizophorae had a wide distribution in the Caribbean. Its distribution was reduced by the early Pliocene Era (about 5 million years ago). This reduction in range appears to be related to changes in soil salinity within the mangrove ecosystems, rising seawater levels, and increasing competition from other more tolerant species. There are genetic differences in the leaves and flowers between the Tea Mangrove growing along the Pacific Coast and the same species in the Caribbean.


Poison Dart Frog Isla Popa

Many birds feed near the water’s edge. This jungle is home to trogons, toucans, rufous and green kingfishers, and various frogs and reptiles. As we walk, we listen to the soundtrack for this adventure that includes relaxing nature sounds, soothing water sounds, and birds singing.

Family at waterfall

We find insects, endemic amphibians, and rare reptiles along the trail. It leads to waterfalls and we traverse through rocks up to a small creek. After wading through the spring water, we make our way back to our kayaks as we check out both the flora and fauna this trail offers.

Our support boat will be waiting at the creek’s mouth to return to Tranquilo Bay.

Where are the people? Curious natives want to know.

White-faced Capuchin Monkey at Panama eco lodge.

Six months into the pause, the locals are wondering, where are all the people? Given there are only a few people around, I believe they might think they can take us.

I check on each of the cabanas every other day. So, when I walked up to the porch of cabana four and a chair was missing, I wondered where it had gone. The fire extinguisher was turned on its side and a walking stick was lying down directly in front of the French doors. I paused, had there been a storm in the night? No.

Looking over the side of the porch, I found the chair. Broken to pieces, but somehow still upright. Were the kids playing on this porch? Not sure, note to self, investigation necessary. 

After I turned on the air-conditioner in that cabana, I continued my walk around the others. I remembered a couple of things out of place at cabana eight, so I went over to check it out. As I approached, I heard something unusual out in the open area.

A barrel of monkeys! White-faced capuchins, to be exact. Looking at me with serious teenage angst, as I made my way up to the cabana. Hmm. Was it possible they were my vandals?

White-faced Capuchin Monkey at Bocas del Toro, Panama lodge.

The troop had been visiting cabanas five and six of late, staying mostly within the trees. A few brave individuals had decided to walk onto cabana five’s porch. Could it be the same rascals who had been on the porches of the other units? When I went up to the dining room, I asked Jim, Jay, and the kids if they thought a monkey could toss a chair off a cabana porch. Based upon what we had seen of late, the unanimous response was sure. What to do now?

The same day, we encountered a group of monkeys on the porch of cabana five. We shooed them away, but only over to cabana six. The next day, Scott scared a capuchin as he was trying to come into the dining room to pilfer a banana off the bar.  Inside the DMZ!

Something had to be done. We wanted to avoid “five little monkeys jumping on the bed.” We like watching monkeys, but we don’t want them on porches or attempting to enter any building, or God forbid, taking off with your binoculars, camera, or scope.  As much as they might enjoy these tools to spy on the other monkey tribes, we are sure you are not interested in donating them to the monkey cause. Nor do we want any of our guests waking up to this:

Monkey looking through glass directly at you.

In fairness, this monkey business had really started in January when we were placing bananas out for the birds on a feeder hanging off of the porch.  Many of our wildlife operators have asked for access to view and photograph the local birds directly from the porch.  Once the local monkeys found free food was available, they visited the bird feeder each day.  We knew we had to keep them off of the porch.  Scott quickly engineered a change to the bird feeders and put together a “monkey” feeder to keep them away from the porch and the bird feeders.  It worked, but only until it didn’t. 

We remembered a story about a similar problem some friend of ours had with monkeys entering one of their buildings and fighting with the other tribe they saw in the mirror. Their guests insisted that the local kids were tearing the place up, however, a game camera later confirmed it was indeed locals – just not humans.  So, they made a curtain and had guests close the curtain whenever they left the building. The reflection was no longer available.  No more troop skirmishes in the bathroom.

Our solution was along the same lines, but we are hoping it is temporary. Now all of our units have “curtains” over the porch windows and French doors. Thus, no reflections are available for the monkeys to wage war with the “visitors.” We also cleaned up the palm fronds and trimmed some of the trees near units, so our buildings were less accessible to our native friends.

It appears the problem is abating—limited signs of monkeys near our structures for a little over a week. Maybe we will install a distortion mirror nearby so they can “reflect” upon their behavior.

Distortion mirror photo

Outside of wanting to avoid broken glass, we need to avoid allowing the monkeys to make porches a regular part of their daily commute. They are wild animals and should be observed from afar, not quite so up close and personal as on your porch.

Many years ago, when we had just opened, a capuchin ran off with Jay’s glasses. It was a pet at a restaurant in town.  Jay went over to take a look at him and before he knew what happened, the monkey was up a tree bending his new toy in all directions.  The owner quickly responded by retrieving Jay’s freshly bent glasses and delivering a couple of cold beers for the trouble.

From Mentalfloss “Eleven Mischievous Facts about Capuchin Monkeys” by Rosemary Mosco:

“Professor Susan Perry of UCLA has been studying white-faced capuchins in the jungles of Costa Rica for 25 years. It’s grueling work, she says; “I’m always wet, chewed on, or stung.” But her hard work has paid off. She and her team have observed some amazing monkey business.

Capuchins often invent new behaviors—Dr. Perry calls them traditions—that spread through the group. One of them is, well, shoving your finger in someone else’s eye. Other traditions include sniffing each other’s hands and sucking on tails, fingers, and ears. Capuchins even bite a tuft of hair from another’s face and pass it around with their mouths. This might all be about reinforcing social bonds [PDF]. Just don’t try it with your coworkers.”

Monkeys have also been observed to do some pretty disgusting things.  They clean their feet with urine.  They great each other by sticking their fingers up each other’s noses.  Jim and Jay have stories to tell from construction days about how the monkeys would throw their own waste at passersby. Cute from afar, not so great where you want to pass some time. Thus, changing their behavior before it becomes a pattern is essential.

We want to avoid potential problems where the monkeys have become so accustomed to humans that they cause mischief as in some Costa Rican national parks. In any place where the monkeys are used to daily interactions with humans, they may approach visitors, grab or steal personal belongings, and in some cases, get aggressive. This can become a serious problem because there are shared risks in that humans are exposed to possible bites, and the animals have changed their natural behavior. Human interaction with monkeys can also spread illness such as a virus amongst the monkeys.  Better to leave each other alone and observe from a distance. At Tranquilo Bay, we like our wildlife wild!

As you can see in Tres’ video, watching them from afar is cool. Seeing them eat, jump, and move about the jungle is fun. We plan on keeping them off the buildings because, as we all remember, “George promised to be good. But it is easy for little monkeys to forget” (H. A. Ray, Curious George).

Day Tour @ Tranquilo Bay

Bocas Day TourWe are really excited to be offering a day tour @ Tranquilo Bay starting this week.  People in the community and a number of visitors to the archipelago have contacted us over time and asked us about providing use of the grounds and facilities to travelers within the archipelago.  We have worked through all the challenges so that we may offer an awesome experience to our day tour participants without effecting our wonderful guests.  So, we begin offering day tours this Wednesday.

Kayaking PanamaWe have coordinated with a botero to provide transportation to and from Tranquilo Bay from Isla Colon at a reasonable price which makes it easy for people to sign up and head out to Isla Bastimentos for a jungle and ocean experience.

Bocas del Toro SnorkelingWe have added a new Day Tour page on our website for you to learn all about it.  As of today, the tour will be available on Wednesdays and Thursdays for up to ten people each day.  Please contact us if you have any questions or have a larger group that would like to visit.

 

Decommissioning and Commissioning a Communications Tower

communicationstowerHere at Tranquilo Bay we have two towers. One, that we commissioned in the summer of 2005, for our communications and a second one, that we commissioned in January 2013 for wildlife observation. Later this week, beginning on July 14, we will decommission the communications tower and replace it with a new one. We anticipate that the changeover will take us less than a week’s time.

We have learned a lot in the years since we installed the first tower. One of the things we have always tried to do is use the best materials we could afford so that our maintenance would be less expensive and time-consuming in the long run. At the time we purchased the communications tower in 2004 we had limited choices about materials, etc. here in Panama. So, we installed what was available at the time.

Thirteen years later the communications tower needs to be replaced. The tower we are replacing it with is made of better materials and will not need to be replaced for a longer time. Thus – it will be something the Tranquilo Bay children are responsible for when the time comes.

As such, we will be out of touch for about a week’s time. We will have radio communications via VHF and some cellular connection while the process is underway. We will also travel over to Isla Colon to check emails, phone calls, etc. every few days.

We believe that we will be without Internet and telephone communications other than on a delayed basis for up to a week through July 21, 2018.  Please understand that we will get back to you – but it may take longer than usual to do so.  Thank you for your patience and understanding.