Investing in The Panama Eco Lodge Vacation You Will Love

A lot of people see a vacation as an expense. But we believe it is an investment. When you schedule a beautiful, sustainable, and memorable experience, it does more than make you feel good. It connects you with each member in your party. It lets you unplug and let go of your everyday. You try new things and relax. The investment you make today should be paid back in treasured memories that last a lifetime.

Experience Cost Per Minute Graph

We pursue and believe in treating your vacation as a precious investment. In trying to compare different breaks from your everyday, we looked at four experiences – one day trip to a Disney theme park, a day at Tranquilo Bay, a quick pop into a coffee shop, and a special occasion meal at Canlis. While all of them allow you to unplug, they each come with their own set of benefits and compromises as well as their own cost.

Disney Park Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Disney theme parks are the best value for your money at $0.14 per minute per person. This calculation is based upon the park entrance fee for the number of minutes the park is open. It does not include any meals, beverages, or special perks.

Tranquilo Bay Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Tranquilo Bay Eco Adventure Lodge is an exceptional value at $0.24 per minute per adult. Children would be $.12 per minute each. This calculation is based upon the high season rate including taxes for 18 hours a day, assuming people sleep about eight hours. The price includes meals, beverages, guided activities onsite, use of the private conservation reserve and equipment among all of the other things included in the daily stay rate.

Coffee Shop Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

Coffee shop coffee is a good value at somewhere around $.33 a minute per person assuming one purchases a $5.00 beverage and spends about 15 minutes inside the coffee shop.

Canlis Dinner Experience Cost Per Minute Per Person Wheel

A special occasion meal at Canlis is a great value at $1.10 per minute per person. This calculation is based upon the price fixe menu at $165 per person with dinner service covering about 2 1/2 hours. This does not include any beverages. I can’t wait until I am able to make it to Canlis to celebrate something!

View of Tranquilo Bay's Front "Yard" from the tower with the word "Off" superimposed

As you can see, there are a number of investments we can all make in ourselves or our families. These vary from something we can stop and pick up every day (coffee shop coffee) to a vacation or meal we must plan on and reserve in advance.

Originally Published on IG: November 11, 2021 Modified slightly for publishing here on our blog.

Balancing Compassion & Respect Can Be An Unbelievably Interesting Tightrope Act

With one land purchase, the woman we were going to buy the property from wanted a house. She would move from her land onto a spot with one of her children. Some of her children got involved and supposedly were building the home for her with the funds when, in reality, they were not. Those children took loans against her deposit because one daughter ensured she was a co-signator on the account. These children didn’t repay their loans or build their mother a house. They squandered the funds because the bank took the collateral, so the woman had nowhere to go. She continued to live in the home on our land until the place was ready to fall.

It wasn’t easy to allow it to unfold as it did, but the same thing could have happened anywhere. A person makes a deal and then relies upon another to help them with their funds. The third person turns out to be untrustworthy, and the seller ends up without the “thing” they were trying to acquire with the proceeds from the sale.

As a buyer, we were in no position to affect the situation’s outcome. As compassionate people, we allowed her to live as she had been doing for an extended period. We didn’t evict her even though she had sold her rights to us. We gave her and her family time to develop a plan. She stayed on far after we had finished paying for the land. Yet, once the time came to either move or somehow build a new home at her current spot, we had to remind her and her family of the boundary we had all agreed upon. She sold us the land. We had paid for it and allowed her to continue living when she had a problem. She was not permitted to build anew on land we purchased because her children had stolen from her. We fulfilled our part of the transaction and allowed her to stay beyond the agreed upon timeframe. It was time for her to find a new home.

Because we had both respect and compassion, we allowed the situation to go past what most purchasers would. According to Albert Schweitzer, “Until he extends his circle of compassion to include all living things, man will not himself find peace.” Our attorney was concerned about her failure to depart once we had finished paying. Since we were her neighbors, we were not as worried as the attorney. Yet, we knew we could not afford to purchase it a second time from a third party, so we had to stay close to the transaction parameters. Balancing compassion and respect can be a tightrope at times.

Join Us At Green Acres Chocolate Farm For An Informative Experience

A trip to the Green Acres Chocolate Farm is unlike any other chocolate tour. That soon becomes clear as we pull up in the boat to this lush hillside rainforest and botanical wonderland.

Chocolate Farm Tour Sign

We encounter howler monkeys bellowing from the distant treetops, sloths hanging from the mangroves and toucans, fruit crows, and black-chested jays flying between the mature fruiting trees of this protected forest. The tour is a tropical nature experience. Gary takes us meandering through his dazzling botanical refuge. He explains about flora and fauna and our essential connections to all this abundant life that grows around us.

Plants and Trees at Chocolate Farm

We walk along in the shade of giant fig, almendro, and wild nutmeg trees towering above us. Gary explains how these cacao trees can grow and produce within the shade of the rainforest, thus maintaining the cycling of nutrients through this rich, healthy ecosystem. This cycle benefits both the cacao and the rainforest trees alike. He explains the fascinating process of growing chocolate in the rainforest. He touches on how the insects, squirrels, and monkeys play an important part in the life history of the cacao trees. These trees hold those precious, antioxidant-rich seeds that have made for a worldwide addiction.

Poison Dart Frog Bocas del Toro

We find an array of herpetofauna: golden-headed geckos, Talamanca Rocket frogs, and the stunning green-and-black poison dart frogs. The poison dart frogs gleam a most outrageous shade of emerald green, marked with a smattering of black blotches. Each each individual frog has its own unique “fingerprint.” These primarily terrestrial frogs hop along, searching for ants, oblivious to the excitement they cause. To maintain their toxicity, poison dart frogs feed upon ants for the poison which they excrete from glands when they feel threatened.   

Chocolate Farm Collage

Gary leads us back down to the waterfront to a tiny processing shed. With a drying platform and fermentation shed on either side of it. The “chocolate factory” or Casita Cacao, is a small-scale operation which was macgyvered by original owner Dave Cerutti using household tools, PVC piping, and small motors. This set up processes the dried cacao beans into nibs and then grinds and melts it into bars. The bars are sold to groups like us who come visit the farm.
When Gary arrived at Green Acres in 2019, he was already well invested in his non-profit, Planet Rehab. This organization is dedicated to wildlife and environmental conservation and education. Gary has interwoven this chocolate farm experience as an opportunity to impart what he has learned about how we can help care for and support local ecosystems. One initiative, planting endangered native tree species, is a component of a healthy rainforest and a way to work with the indigenous Ngöbe community.

Chocolate Farm Product Collage

By the end of the half-day tour, we tasted, enjoyed, and appreciated the rainforest and the decadence of Bocas del Toro’s gold: 100% cacao. Oh, and maybe a delicious shot of Green Acres’ famous chocolate rum as we cheer “salad!” to a beautiful day of learning and love for nature and its biodiverse bounty.

Mutual Respect Supports Creation of Promising Private Conservation Reserve

Tranquilo Bay’s path to regeneration has been a winding trail with ups, downs, and spills. We didn’t start our business with a defined intention to set up our space within the vocabulary we find in regeneration now, and yet – we did.

Our approach has been more about being a permanent part of the community in which we live. We believe this colors all decisions one makes. When you begin with a permanence mindset and know you are in for a long haul, you make different decisions than if you expect to be around for a season of life.

Because we planned on making Bocas del Toro our home, we took steps to manage our relationships with our neighbors and our community from the beginning. When we completed the survey for the land we were purchasing, we walked the boundaries. We made sure the surveyor drew the survey lines correctly. We spoke to each of our neighbors to ensure we had the limits right. We confirmed that no one else had a stake in the land we were purchasing. We got to know our neighbors, and we began a relationship of mutual respect in these types of matters.

Conservation Reserve Infographic

Dr. Brené Brown tells us that “when we fail to set boundaries and hold people accountable, we feel used and mistreated.” We didn’t want to feel used or mistreated, nor did we want our neighbors to feel that way. So, we set appropriate boundaries and became contributing members of our community.

We applied our values of taking care of your immediate neighborhood to our new home. All our adjacent neighbors became our immediate neighborhood.

Laying this groundwork has been an essential part of the foundation for our business. Mutual respect rather than an assumption of privilege makes for a far better long-term relationship.

What does mutual respect look like? How do you know if it is present or if you are pursuing it?

For us, it meant making sure we knew where the boundaries lay. Then we knew where we stopped, and our neighbors started. It meant we were responsible for our side and not crossing onto their side.

It meant structuring land deals so that both parties had a long-term benefit and relationship. In Bocas del Toro, many people sold their land only to be without cash in a short time because the money came and went. If we were purchasing a piece of land from someone that wasn’t a part of their primary residence, we would buy it straight away because there was no concern about the community’s trajectory. However, whenever we purchased land that was a part of someone’s residence, we took a different path.

We structured a payment plan that worked best for that person and transaction. Structuring it this way gave each party a benefit. The party we were purchasing from had an extended source of regular income. We gave them a sufficient down payment to have a cash bump. They could do something like make significant improvements, buy a boat, or provide a dividend for each of their children. In return, we were able to pay for our investment over time.

Some of the payment plans were based on a set value for the property – those were paid out over a shorter period. Others were based upon a much longer payout where we guaranteed a half-salary for them for many years or until death. While we didn’t know the ultimate price for the land under this setup, we believed it was the right way to support our community.

Learn More About Bocas Eco Lodge’s Remarkable Economic Impact

During the pandemic pause, I studied the Economic Nutrition label that @shorefastfogoisland uses for its social enterprises. In an article entitled “5 Regenerative Solutions For A Positive Future Through Tourism” where @regenerativetravel summarized takeaways from its 2020 Regenerative Travel Summit, Zita Cobb from Shorefast championed radical transparency so that “we can avoid all of the greenwashing and the social washing and the marginalizing of local people, because it’s not dignified for local people, and it’s not dignified for the visitors.”⁣

Her stance, and our studies of our own business, caused us to review our own economic impact. What Shorefast has done and what companies such as Everlane are doing in a retail environment is give the consumer more information about where their money is going. We want to do the same.⁣

Thus we went back and looked at our impact for 2019 since it was a “normal” year. We hadn’t set up our accounting to manage the information as well as we could, but it gave us a baseline to begin from. In 2020 we updated our Chart of Accounts and our regular accounting to better provide information in the future.⁣

Economic Benefit Distribution is a measure of all expenditures made by Tranquilo Bay. Our instance includes Labor & Benefits, purchases from businesses and people within various distances from Tranquilo Bay within Panama, and then those expenses completed outside of Panama. ⁣

Once the number is calculated based on the data within each category, it is then formatted as a percentage of the total company expense.⁣


60% of our expenditures are made within the archipelago and province of Bocas del Toro. An incremental 24% is made within 100 KM of the lodge, so 84% of our expenditures are made within 100 KM of the lodge. We spend about 5% of our total expenditure within Panama but outside of this 100 KM radius which takes all of our spending within Panama to 89%.⁣

So we have 11% of the funds we spend paid to businesses and people outside of Panama itself. We haven’t drilled down into specific items as to whether or not they are made within Panama only from whom we purchase them. One area where we aspire for improvement would be determining where we stand with local goods purchased from grocery stores, etc. We updated our accounting for 2020 to incorporate more detail to calculate that information.⁣

Community Dollar Flow is a measure of all funds that flow into a community because of a particular company. Our instance includes Labor & Benefits, purchases from businesses and people within a 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay, gratuities left for staff, donations made within a 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay, and volunteer hours provided within 100 KM distance from Tranquilo Bay. Once the number is calculated based on the data within each category, it is then formatted as a percentage of the total company expense.

It is possible to exceed 100% of company expenses within the direct community because the inputs are broader. We are not there yet, but we can continue to aspire for improvement.

This is a graphic example of Community Dollar Flow. ⁣

  1. Labor and benefits paid to or on behalf of our staff.⁣
  2. Purchases from people and businesses within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay. This includes both goods and services. A local tour, transportation, and food vendor would all be included within this category.⁣
  3. Gratuities left for our staff outside of our guides. Our guide tips tend to be direct, and we do not account entirely for these amounts.⁣ Beginning in 2022, we will also include the guide tips as appropriate.
  4. Donations, either in cash or in-kind, made by Tranquilo Bay or our guests within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay.⁣
  5. Volunteer hours provided by lodge ownership, staff, or guests within 100 KM of Tranquilo Bay. These hours are accounted for at local labor or consulting levels as they are all provided in kind.⁣

    Taking the total of each of these categories into consideration, for 2019, 97% of our expense level flows directly into the community within 100 KM from Tranquilo Bay. This differs from the 89% of our direct expenses within Panama. We have also added categories three, four, and five, which are contributions to the community yet are not a direct expense.⁣

We now look at this information monthly to ensure things are staying in line and heading in the direction we want. We won’t update it annually until we have a full year of business, and we didn’t have that in 2020 or 2021. We are hopeful that in 2022 we will be open the entire year.⁣

Bocas Eco Lodge Describes Its Unique Guiding Principles

At Tranquilo Bay, we believe that people who experience an authentic, regenerative vacation create treasured memories, but we know treasured memories do not come easy. ⁣

How do you make sure you pick the right vacation? Are the places you are considering transparent about their sustainability and regenerative practices? ⁣

We hope so. That is why we are sharing this type of information about Tranquilo Bay within our transparency and impact series. ⁣

In “Move Over, Sustainable Travel. Regenerative Travel Has Arrived,” the New York Times writes, “Sustainable tourism is sort of a low bar. At the end of the day, it’s just not making a mess of the place. Regenerative tourism says, let’s make it better for future generations.” ⁣

We know that the best measurement we can track is how we improve against ourselves, not against a third party. Thus, we monitor specific metrics to determine how we are doing today and how things change over time. ⁣

If you fail to choose the best location, you could travel to another country and lose your hard-earned vacation time at a commercial green-washed “resort.” We want to help you make the right choice for you and your party. ⁣

We care about your vacation. We care about Bocas del Toro, Panama. We care about doing our part to be the change we want to see in the world. We know you want to do the same when you plan your vacation. ⁣

So, at Tranquilo Bay, we have a set of guiding principles that help us make decisions. This graphic gives you a basic overview of those principles and what’s behind them: steward, serve & sustain.⁣

Stewardship in Action

Under our first principle, which is stewardship, we work to conserve and regenerate that which has been placed into our hands such that we are accountable to the community and the world.⁣

⁣For us, stewardship is where regeneration comes in because regeneration is about “whole systems thinking.” It considers the history of a place to understand one’s role as a steward of the location and its people.⁣

⁣It is no easy feat – it requires specific critical actions to help us make the next right move each day. Within stewardship, we practice ownership or accountability, and we take responsibility for our actions or inaction. We remember to efficiently, diligently, and happily complete our work because we each have commitments to support our team.⁣

Service in Action

Our second principle is that we serve. We support all stakeholders through open-hearted curation and creative communication. This principle is where we practice “after you.” We put others before our self-interest to support our stakeholders: employees, families, guests, the local community, and the world. ⁣

⁣With some profit staying within Tranquilo Bay, we can support a group of employees, guests, the community, and the local economy. As you can see with the connected circles, each group is more inclusive than before. We all rely on one another to preserve and protect Bocas del Toro’s culture, flora, and fauna. A company must be profitable to continue to be a force for good. ⁣

⁣The Singapore Tatler writes, “More than sustainability, regenerative travel allows us to actively participate in reversing climate change and enriching communities.” While there are many definitions for sustainability and a growing number for regeneration, all include serving one another. We must get past our desires and work for the greater good. Our decision-making processes need to consider all creation because we live within that creation – there is no planet B.⁣

Sustainability in Action

Our third principle is that we must Sustain. We do the work that considers the long-term effect of our actions, and we must sustain the business to be a force for good. ⁣

Here we take responsibility for our actions or inaction. Because we know we must sustain this business, this principle reminds us to efficiently, diligently, and happily complete our work.⁣

⁣Under this principle, we place our work in community tourism, education, and science. We work with several different community tourism organizations in Panama, including the Chamber of Tourism of Bocas del Toro (“CAMTURBO”). CAMTURBO is responsible for supporting tourism throughout the province of Bocas del Toro through education, policymaking, and marketing for the destination.⁣

We are also members of APTSO – the sustainable tourism foundation for Panama. We have previously been a part of BSTA, a sustainable tourism alliance for Bocas del Toro. Sustainability is also where we assist local organizations that put children in Bocas del Toro first. We provide field trips for children or auction items for fundraisers for these groups.⁣

⁣As part of our education focus with our guests, it is vital to work with international and national organizations that document, preserve and catalog flora and fauna of Bocas del Toro. We also work with various scientists who study wildlife here in Bocas. You may see an inclusive list of these projects in our Impact Report.⁣

Our Why

Our values and decision-making process have evolved over the years. We embrace aspects of several different philosophies.⁣

We embrace the Triple Bottom Line at the bottom of the pyramid – people, place, and profit. This is where companies are responsible first and foremost to all their stakeholders, including everyone involved with the company, whether directly or indirectly, as well as the planet we’re all living on. But without making a profit – the company cannot continue to be a force for good, so it must make money to keep going.⁣

⁣With the next level – the World We All Deserve. Both environmental and social justice intersect for the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income concerning the development, implementation, and enforcement of laws, regulations, and policies. It’s a lot – but we work on it bit by bit.⁣

⁣The third level – is the aspirational side of regenerative tourism. We are never finished, and we can always learn more and do better once we know more.⁣

⁣And the last level – the one most easily defined as The Golden Rule, where we treat others as we would want to be treated.⁣

⁣We do all of this because it is just and right AND because doing so truly supports our guests’ vacations.⁣

The Monumental Perils & Trials of Being a Baby Bird

It’s a new Rufito!

At the time of the photo, this bitty baby Rufous-tailed hummingbird had hatched ten days before and endures a tighter and tighter squeeze each and every day in that tiny nest as mother tirelessly feeds this immobile yet very hungry little chick.

Baby birds (not just hummingbirds) have a hard go of it, even before they’ve hatched out of that delicate, vulnerable eggshell. When it comes to nature, if your defenses are down (or non-existent, as is the case with most of our nestbound babies), there is no mercy should a predator happen by.

Stripe-throated Hermit nest

And there are many predators in the rainforest that consider an inhabited nest a free-for-all dinner plate! So what can baby birds do about it? Well, nothing. So instead, they must depend upon their parents to have evolved and obtained the necessary considerations and instincts required for where and how they build their nest.

And camoflage is KEY.

This nest, containing our impossibly adorable rufous-tailed hummingbird chick is made out of silky fibers from plants and spider webs and then plastered with bits of dead leaves and lichen to help the tiny cup nest from being detected among the branches by wandering eyes. Nevertheless, no matter how much effort is put in to the building of the nest and making it appear camouflaged, the immense importance of the nest *location* is also very key.

At this point, I’m almost convinced that if we humans can find a nest, then predators are seeing it too and that was practically confirmed as I watched a total of 5 hummingbird nests fail this year, some of which were hatchlings between a couple days old to more than a week. Prime predator for our defenseless little birds? Snakes. Another surprising predator we found were ants, which could reach some of the far spots on the branches that were too precarious for a serpent to reach.

Weather comes into play as well in the survival of an exposed chick, and with the occasional nighttime rains we’ve had of late. So we can only hope the momma hummer stays put and keeps that chick dry while it very slowly grows in those essential, water resisting, protective feathers!

Stripe-throated Hermit nestling

Baby hummingbirds hatch completely devoid of feathers and only a few wisps of down and thus are actually considered cold-blooded during this time, meaning they have no control of their body temperature which is thus subject to the surrounding conditions. If a hummingbird chick gets wet, it is unable to stabilize its body temperature and thus is in grave danger of dying without any protective insulation layer of feathers over their skin.

So baby hummers, and baby birds in general, have a lot at stake during the most vulnerable point in their lives. Should you come across a bird nest in your nature wanderings, it’s best to leave it be and let the parents do their job. Make sure you are far enough away that a worried parent bird can return without fear to carry out raising that precious little bit of life and carry on the next generation.

Rocking the Unique “Green Season” at Tranquilo Bay

While people may call our green season, the low season, we’ve been busy here at Tranquilo Bay on the lush green island of Bastimentos surrounded by mangroves, rainforest, beach and the rich Caribbean Sea. 

Nothing really stops here at the lodge, even if there happens to be a lull in guests. In fact, this time of the year (we call it winter, here in the tropics) is the time of some of Tranquilo’s hardest, most intense work. Jay runs his team of wildly strong and tireless workers: our own Sanchez, Alvaro and Gustavo, our indigenous N’gobe muchachos who double as captain and triple as landscapers, builders and all around renaissance men. These are the same sweet guys who you’ll see on their knees in the sand, shoulder to shoulder with our youngster guests, helping dig holes and build sandcastles on any Zapatilla beach day.

Some of what they have been working on includes many projects around the grounds and one of which includes preparing a space, sifting, hauling and tamping tons of sand, and installing the 20-some thousand gallon bladder, which was a backbreaking achievement that will give us more rain catchment and put us in a good position for the next drought. Who do we have to thank? 

These guys! 

As far as the the rest of us, Everyone has gone on some pretty wonderful adventures, in some cases wanderings abroad because we use the low season to travel. Guides Ramon and Natalia spends a couple months traveling to see their families in Valencia, Spain and Medellin, Colombia. The Kimballs, (Jim, Renee, Tres and Boty) visited the states and their ol’ homeland Texas, road-tripping all over to see friends and family.

Luis of Quebrada Enrique

Together with the Violas (Jay, Scott and Patrick), back here at the lodge, we have gone on various adventures, including a reconnaissance excursion to a little-trodden section of trail owned and maintained by Luis, a local restaurant and landowner. Luis invited us and guided us onto his stunningly beautiful property. We had toucans and trogons peer at us from the greenery overhead and countless tiny, brilliant strawberry poison dart frogs hopped on the trail around us, yet another array of beautiful color morphs and patterns. Beautiful flowing marañon trees dropped their wispy, vibrant pink petals as ground decoration, a small bodied, large eyed ruddy tailed flycatcher wagged on a branch above us and even a rufous and green kingfisher fished in the same secret forest pond that we cooled off in. 

Hugo Santa Cruz, Lic. in Tourism and Protected Areas Management

Since going with the Kimballs before they left, we’ve been back to this new trail twice, the Violas and I along with intern hailing from Bolivia, Hugo Santa Cruz. We had a blast, as each visit we saw new and different wildlife. This is definitely going to be a new favorite to add to our array of off-site adventure excursions!

 

In addition to all that’s gone on, our “low season” has also resulted in about six weeks straight of visiting guests! We’ve had families (including my own parents and longtime family friends of the Kimballs, the Moseley’s who visit annually), birders, wildlife photographers and even a huge multi-family reunion that chose Tranquilo Bay for their special event. Some might think that since it’s so hot up north where it’s summertime now, it must be boiling down in the tropics, but we truly only endure a range of about five degrees difference in temperature year round! While we’ve had some rainy adventures (as is possible during anytime throughout the year), our gung-ho guests know that this beautiful rainforest would be nothing if not for the precious moisture that makes the lush greenery of beautiful Isla Bastimentos the true wildly productive and biodiverse rainforest that it is.

 

 

The Truth About Sloths: Furry Residents Of The Tropical Forest

Panama has three species of sloths: the Hoffman´s Two-toed Sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni), the Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus variegatus), and the unique Pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus), restricted to the Escudo de Veraguas Island, an island about 2 hours by boat from Tranquilo Bay.

Two-toed Sloth Panama

Two Hoffman´s Two-toed Sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni)

The life of all the sloths occur mostly at the trees, where they perform extremely well, they are also good swimmers, but don’t do it in a regular basis, only when its needed; they try to avoid the ground, where they are more vulnerable to potential predators (one of their main predators are big cats, and a sloth on the ground will be an easy meal).

Panama Wildlife

Hoffman´s Two-toed Sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni)

Two-toed Sloths are slightly larger than three-toed Sloths, harder to see, because of their nocturnal habits, never the less, they can be observed during the day, actively moving or feeding, for short periods of time. You can imagine how happy we where when we found those two Hoffman´s Two-toed Sloths, when we encounter them a few weeks ago, taking a siesta and eating a snack in a very open area, at eye level!

Praying from my window

Insects PanamaNature lovers can be defined in many ways, because we are very different human beings, but one thing that I always find in all of us, is the capacity for surprise and the excitement that any natural event that we find provides. We also know that it can happen anywhere at anytime, I’m sure that, while reading these lines, if you are a nature lover, you are reliving one of the memories of wild encounters under strange situations, at the “wrong time”, “wrong place” or just in an unexpected location.

One event that we got to witness was a praying mantis hatch … in our window! As you can imagine, it was not hard to find, but the timing was great.  We got to see all the young mantis around their Ootheca, which is the protective covering that houses the eggs until they hatch. Young praying mantis will hatch from 3 to 6 weeks after the eggs were laid and they will be an avid predator like its parents.  These nymphs go for small prey but can also feast on their siblings as some studies point out.

It was a gift to be there, witnessing this amazing natural event.

When we found them, not knowing how much time the hatch would last, we immediately went to the school to show the kids and anybody we found along the way.  Almost everybody on site that day got to experience this ephemeris nature show and we all have a new memory to store in our wildlife encounter’s shelf.Wildlife Panama